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20121204
20121204
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how much good cheer he's feeling from his conservative senate colleague jim demint who has chastised him today and i'm quoting mr. de ment menthe, speaker boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more while not reducing our $16 trillion debt by a single penny, and he continues with this line, big government is the cause of our debt crisis. sir, big government, what about the two big long wars and the big bush tax cuts as being responsible for the in accordance debt? did they have no part to play? >> well, there's no question about that, but the truth of the matter is you start your slashing of government in matter what part, laying off people, throwing them into the unemployment marment, making certain we have no disposable income, can't pay for mortgages, can't pay rent, can't pay for food and services, what happens to the small businessman that's already catching hell in the community? in other words, unless people get together and have some protection for the vulnerable and to make certain that those in the top 2%
. >> alfonso, speaker boehner is already seeing backlash within his own party, jim demint releasing a statement calling the tax revenue proportion of boehner's $800 billion tax hike. so here it is with boehner trying to make the base happy, meanwhile trying to meet the president within these negotiations and rise up to his leadership vision. what else is it that the base doesn't seem to like? if the base was able to rally around the right candidate that they wanted to for president, mitt romney would be worried about this coming up in the next presidential term. >> look, the fact that boehner's been criticized by conservative organizations and other republicans show that he's seriously considering negotiating the white house and we saw the results of the election, we're willing to concede their increases in revenue but to the point of my colleague, we are not in parliamentary democracy but we're not in a monarchy either. we're in a constitutional democracy and the mandate of the people was for both parties to work together. republicans are saying, we're willing to increase revenue. what is the
conservatives up here on capitol hill. take a look at this statement from senator jim demint of south carolina, conservative republican. he said speaker boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more while not reducing our $16 trillion debt by a single penny. that's jim demint you can the con s -- the conservative senator. i talked to mitch mcconnell, the republican leader up here. he didn't seem as bothered by the boehner proposal. he told me i'm glad that they are at least talking and harry reid said something very interesting to me, the democratic senate leader. he said that boehner might be in a position now where he has to choose between keeping the speakership and protect country, very tough stakes from harry reid, really putting you the pressure on speaker boehner. tyler? >> we are hearing word that potentially new senator elizabeth warren of massachusetts may join the senate banking committee. have you heard that? what does that mean? >> we have heard that. we have been able to confirm that independently. and it is some
in the house and the senate are on board. jim demint, republican senator from south carolina. >> this is a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table until he puts something there that we can work with. the president has known about this fiscal cliff for over a year. and many of his decisions caused us to be in this position. >> how much of a problem does boehner have with other republicans potentially? >> it's a big problem. it's always been his problem. it's been a problem for the republican party since they started taking that no tax pledge 30 years ago. what is revenue increase? is closing deductions and loopholes a revenue increase? and if so, do you have to oppose that? i think what we see going on in the republican party right now is a fight between the stalwart, no new tax whatever conservatives and those who believe that they have a responsibility to keep the country from going over the fiscal cliff in the short term and in the long-term. and as jessica was pointing out
split. for example, senator jim demint said speaker boehner's tax hike will destroy american jobs and allow politicians to spend even more, et cetera, et cetera. keep in mind where boehner started, that's not where they're going to end up. they have to go to the left, so he's going to have a problem on his hands at least from some parts of the party. this woenn't be the end, either. immigration is probably next. that's another tough pill for some republicans to swallow, so this is going to be an ongoing saga. >> you're right that it is a very inside the beltway story, but it is sort of an important story in that we see how boehner has to deal with this caucus. he's kind of got multiple factions around him, multiple parts of the gop to rein in. that's probably the most difficult part for him, and he has this white house very powerful, has the leverage, has the wind at its back from just winning the election. the people are saying that they're going to blame the republicans if this -- if we dive off the cliff. now, if they don't sell the capitulation in the right way, then the right
're having such a difficult time with that. let me get your take on what senator jim demint said. he said house speaker john boehner's plan, which of course is raising $800 billion in proposed revenue by overhauling the tax code. it's not necessarily raising the rate. it's broadening the base, perhaps lowering some taxes and overhauling that tax code. he said that would destroy american jobs. as the chief executive of a major u.s. corporation, do you agree with that? >> i think it's hard to decide whether it's going to destroy a job until you know what the specifics are. i do think you need to provide incentives for people to keep growing their business, to make more money. i think a really high progressive tax rate won't do that. i do think -- if you raise the rates by a couple points, it's not going to drive everybody crazy. i think what we have to do is get the government out of this industrial policy where every time we turn around, they want something done. they pass a tax law. they get people to invest in it. then they turn around and blame you for taking advantage of the tax law. t
carolina senator jim demint, a staunch fiscal conservative, blasted the plan on twitter today. he said speaker boehner's offer of an $800 billion tax hike will destroy jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more. but the senate's democratic majority leader harry reid warned republicans against listening to such voices. >> you can't let these negotiations be dictated by the tea party. our guiding principle should be the views of the vast majority of the american people. the math is clear. the only way to accomplish these things is to allow the rates to go up on the top two percent of tax payers. we're not going to twist ourselves into contortions to apiece a vocal minority of the tea party. >> reporter: in turn, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell said president obama needs to ride herd on democrats if there's any hope of agreement. >> only one person in the country can deliver the members of his party to support a deal that he makes. and that's the president. there have been no deals of this magnitude made in modern times in congress and forced on a reluctant preside
boehner's deal. senator jim demint says the tax hike will destroy american jobs. the coke brothers say leaves conservatives wanting. the heritage foundation said the proposal was asking republicans to go back on their promise not to raise taxes. so there is pushback. >> there is push back. it's not surprising there's push back, given the fact this is essentially on economic issues. all that the republican party has stood for for decades now. but what's going to be important to look for is what are those numbers. i think there are going to be a certain number of republicans who don't vote for it. that's a given. you have to look at how many republicans do vote for it. the question here is will those republicans who support a compromise deal, support increased taxes face a backlash in their own primaries? will they suffer at the ballot box? i think if you have a good, substantial chunk of the republican caucus going along with the deal, there are safety in numbers so they can't be voted out, they can't be primaried in that same way if a lot of them go along with it. >> now, a lot of this
of those conservatives is senator jim demint. listen to what he said. >> republicans should not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves, and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. this is not a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us, his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table until he puts something there that we can work with. >> reporter: now, brooke, house republican leaders are particularly those in speaker boehner's office are saying this is proof that they have moved away from the traditional republican position, moving towards the white house. so the white house should take that into consideration. but there definitely is an important undercurrent we should explore here, which is the fact that at the end of the day, if there is a deal, i talked to some republicans who say that the speaker really has to be careful to get the majority of a majority of his republican conference in order to make sure that he -- >> a majority of majority.
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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